1. 25 April 2012

    It was only a matter of time before I posted something from Cortonville: an online village so to say filled with streets, places and cafes to browse to for must-see-videos, haven’t-you-heard-this-album and listen-to-this-amazing-story adventures. Created by Eric Corton, a man I genuinely look up to because not only of his fine sense for good new music, but even more so for his ability and persistence to get it to the people… because it deserves to be heard. 

    One of the many items featured on the website is the Drive-In Video on E.C. Street. Claiming to always have something to enlighten your day this particular item, after the sites been launched in Beta for barely a week, already proves to be worth while. In the documentary above we get an insight on how ‘Mathilda’ works, a robot machine build for the band ‘De Staat' to actually perform with on stage. Check out how. 

     
  2. 20 April 2012
     
     media  quote 
  3. 11 April 2012

    Now this is how you do advertising! Awesome. 

     
  4. 10 March 2012

    Once again I’ve found myself taking part in the modern western world where we absorb faster than ever, avoid efforts to look beyond what’s handed to you and rarely format our own opinion on the matter.

    Yesterday I posted a video about Joseph Kony and the campaign by the Invisible Children. On first hand the campaign looks legit and the way the video was put together made sure you feel compelled to join and donate. However, not everything is always as it seems. And although I wasn’t quite sure about this perfect looking guy, with his perfect life and expensive gadgets, it still amazed me and the idea of a major collaboration around the world felt exciting.

    But to be completely honest with you, after receiving a couple of tweets and facebook messages by friends who dug a little deeper and gave me other insights on the story, I felt embarrassed standing up for a campaign as such. This video and this article made the biggest impression on me. If you’ve watched the Kony video before, be sure to check this out as well and while you’re at it, Google some. 

     
     KONY2012  media 
  5. 10 February 2012

    Amazing showreel from Design Is Dead 2012. 

     
  6. 29 January 2012
    
The internet is full of mediocre photography, while real talent often remains unknown. SNOR (mustache) showcases real talent through an online magazine. SNOR was initiated by Bert and Bruno, probably (hopefully) two guys with mustaches.
Everyone is allowed to send in their pictures, the editorial office decides what makes it to the magazine. You don’t have to pay, you don’t get payed. Just portrait among other talented photographers and viewed by many photograph lovers.
SNOR also blogs about interesting photograph related news. Must see expositions, auctions, competitions and of course about the new SNOR issue. Go to http://www.snor.it

    The internet is full of mediocre photography, while real talent often remains unknown. SNOR (mustache) showcases real talent through an online magazine. SNOR was initiated by Bert and Bruno, probably (hopefully) two guys with mustaches.

    Everyone is allowed to send in their pictures, the editorial office decides what makes it to the magazine. You don’t have to pay, you don’t get payed. Just portrait among other talented photographers and viewed by many photograph lovers.

    SNOR also blogs about interesting photograph related news. Must see expositions, auctions, competitions and of course about the new SNOR issue. Go to http://www.snor.it

     
     SNOR  photography  magazine  online  talent  art  media 
  7. 30 November 2011
     
     unicorn  media  picture  letter 
  8. 22 November 2011

    A cool followup to a dissertation that music blogs are dying. And while you’re at it, also read the hilarious but ever so true 14 ways to not be a terrible music fan.

    14) There’s no such thing as “Best” when it comes to music. Really! When someone says “Best,” they actually mean “Favorite.” They just want you to click through their five-page albums list, which you totally did. (If they actually meant “Best,” they’re probably wearing a t-shirt with a wolf on it right now. Take a deep breath.)”

     
     media  music  14 ways  blog  blogs  fan  Rawkblog 
  9. 22 November 2011
    Wow. Hard to believe a place like this existed. (for more and larger images and the whole story go here)

arsvitaest:

Kowloon Walled City was a densely populated, largely ungoverned settlement in Kowloon, Hong Kong. Originally a Chinese military fort, the Walled City became an enclave after the New Territories were leased to Britain in 1898.
Its population increased dramatically following the Japanese occupation of Hong Kong during World War II. From the 1950s to the 1970s, it was controlled by Triads and had high rates of prostitution, gambling, and drug use. In 1987, the Walled City contained 33,000 residents within its 6.5-acre (0.03 km2; 0.01 sq mi) borders.
In January 1987, the Hong Kong government announced plans to demolish the Walled City. After an arduous eviction  process, demolition began in March 1993 and was completed in April  1994. Kowloon Walled City Park opened in December 1995 and occupies the  area of the former Walled City. Some historical artifacts from the Walled City, including its yamen building and remnants of its South Gate, have been preserved there.


The buildings were often built without blueprint,  and stayed up mostly by leaning against their neighbors.


(for more and larger images go here)

    Wow. Hard to believe a place like this existed. (for more and larger images and the whole story go here)

    arsvitaest:

    Kowloon Walled City was a densely populated, largely ungoverned settlement in Kowloon, Hong Kong. Originally a Chinese military fort, the Walled City became an enclave after the New Territories were leased to Britain in 1898.

    Its population increased dramatically following the Japanese occupation of Hong Kong during World War II. From the 1950s to the 1970s, it was controlled by Triads and had high rates of prostitution, gambling, and drug use. In 1987, the Walled City contained 33,000 residents within its 6.5-acre (0.03 km2; 0.01 sq mi) borders.

    In January 1987, the Hong Kong government announced plans to demolish the Walled City. After an arduous eviction process, demolition began in March 1993 and was completed in April 1994. Kowloon Walled City Park opened in December 1995 and occupies the area of the former Walled City. Some historical artifacts from the Walled City, including its yamen building and remnants of its South Gate, have been preserved there.

    The buildings were often built without blueprint, and stayed up mostly by leaning against their neighbors.



    (for more and larger images go here)

    (via kellychilton)

     
  10. 16 November 2011

    For the "Perfect Darkness Tour 2011-2012" Fink collaborated with the guys from 59 Productions who build an incredible set for an amazing live experience. Here’s a little making of about how they did it. 

     
  11. 14 November 2011

    This guy is absolutely right. A very interesting TED talk by Jason Fried who lays out the main problems and offers three suggestions to make work work. 

    Jason also wrote a book about it called Rework”. 

     
     Jason Fried  TED  video  media  work 
  12. 30 October 2011
    Amazing and intriguing pictures taken in Japan Northeast Coast over a six-month period. Last Sunday was the six-month anniversary of the day the massive earthquake and tsunami devastated Japan’s northeast coast. See all. 

    Amazing and intriguing pictures taken in Japan Northeast Coast over a six-month period. Last Sunday was the six-month anniversary of the day the massive earthquake and tsunami devastated Japan’s northeast coast. See all

     
  13. 28 October 2011

    lijne:

    All my online shopping frustrations in 2 minutes lol

    (Source: youtube.com, via dontdiehesitate)

     
  14. 28 October 2011

    Steve Stoute sits down with Jay-Z to talk about ‘The Tanning Effect’ as part of a video series to coincide with his new book ‘The Tanning of America: How the Culture of Hip-Hop Rewrote the Rules of the New Economy’. Stoute is a very well-spoken, intelligent man that has been a phenomenal matchmaker between the popular culture and corporate America for years. He launched Translation Consultation & Brand Imaging in 2004, and linked Justin Timberlake to McDonald’s for the fast food chain’s “I’m Loving It” campaign, helped seal LeBron James’ partnership with State Farm Insurance, Gwen Stefani’s pact with Hewlett-Packard, Lady Gaga’s deal with MAC Comestics, and Jay-Z’s exclusive line with Reebok.

    Read the first chapter of his book 
    in which Stoute recalls watching up close how Run-DMC’s alliance with Adidas helped save the sneaker company from extinction. 

    ————————————————————————————————-

    The Tanning of America

    Chapter 1 – Walk This Way

    "Curiosity as Cultural, Economic Yeast"

    Haters are reactionary, hate anything new or different, and see danger in venturing off into the unknown. They are certainly not friendly to creative expansion or marketing risk. In the 1980s, a decade of conglomerate takeovers and corporate megamergers, one group of haters who stood in the way of hip-hop’s mainstream success was populated by the marketing power players at leading brands.

    That’s why it was so unprecedented when Adidas marketing executive Angelo Anastasio came to Madison Square Garden and was wowed enough by what he saw to strike the endorsement deal for the trio of rappers. As it was pointed out to me by Lyor Cohen (there that night as Run-DMC’s road manager), the mainstream market appeal wasn’t the main selling point for Anastasio. The crowd that night was still mostly African-American, with a smaller percentage of Hispanic and Asian concertgoers and a sprinkling of white urban kids. But what made Anastasio different from other corporate representatives, according to Lyor, was his curiosity. He was simply open-minded enough to contemplate the possibilities of introducing hip-hop to the marketing machinery behind Adidas sneakers.

    When Lyor described that night and how everything fell into place, it occurred to me how important curiosity is in general for tanning to occur. And as a marketing 101 lesson, one that I had to learn and one I have to remind corporate clients not to forget, advertising dollars don’t mean a thing without genuine curiosity about what consumers want and need. In fact, as Lyor recalled, while the Adidas/Run-DMC alliance did well for all concerned—saving the company from extinction—it could have been much more successful. Unfortunately, instead of gaining consumer insights and bringing Run, DMC, or Jam Master Jay in on designing the footwear and in on how to promote their line of sneakers, the company took over for Angelo and ran a campaign with the old-school “father knows best” approach. They let the designers try to figure out the culture and design into it without a true understanding of the consumer. They marketed via the monologue that dictates cool rather than inviting consumers to partake in the cool. That said, the Adidas missteps were going to be lessons learned for certain entrepreneurs who were paying attention and whose business wheels were starting to turn. For them, it was fortunate that there were mainstream corporate haters who even by the late 1980s weren’t curious enough to even consider hip-hop’s musical future. Why do I say that it was fortunate for these entrepreneurs? Because it allowed them and local economies to benefit and prime the pump for everyone else to follow suit.

    Surprisingly, the second group of haters who slowed rap music’s mainstream success—and who weren’t curious about its potential—actually came from within the African-American community. Typically older, wealthier, assimilated generations who had come out of the era of protest and civil rights, they reacted with discomfort to the bravado of youthful aspiration and the booming bass of rap blasting out of car stereos and trekking down the streets. Their position, it seemed, was that they had worked too hard for too long, following paths into higher education and into positions of influence in politics, business, and media, to support the hip-hop phenomenon that might outshine them or disrupt their means of having stature. Black media, usually the first to back African-American entertainment, was especially resistant to embracing hip-hop. Until rap music proved itself worthy of mainstream consideration, most of the top black radio stations and video programmers just weren’t interested. In fact, there were radio stations that specifically said on air, “We don’t play rap music,” in order to get more listeners. However, because of the mostly generational divide, it forced hip-hop to become bigger than just a genre of popular music with merchandise; it forced it to prove itself in mighty ways and to develop capacities for spreading into the worlds of fashion, beauty, art, dance, sports, gaming, language, lifestyle, and eventually politics.

    And that’s how the culture left behind its house party roots and really took on a life of its own to become bigger than the sum of its parts. It was like any other teenager, determined to grow up and become whoever it chose to be. If you are a marketer hoping to attract new customers without losing your core consumers, this early phase of hip-hop still has relevance for how you appeal to aspiration and how you use code to do so. As we will see later on, consumers provide all the needed cues for how to do that—as long as attention is paid to them.

    Reprinted from The Tanning of America by Steve Stoute by arrangement with Gotham Books, a member of Penguin Group (USA) Inc., Copyright © 2011 by Steve Stoute.  

    (Source: dailymovement)

     

I get inspired everyday. Exceeding video's, disarming music, innovative marketing, mesmerizing artwork but also through little things like well placed colorful post-its, noodles and a funny shaped leaf. I hope some day, maybe even by accident, I get to inspire others.

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